• Marie McIntosh receives Mayor’s City Builder Award

    mariemcintosh

    August 26, 2015 – Mayor Jim Watson and Capital Ward Councillor David Chernushenko presented the Mayor’s City Builder Award today to Marie McIntosh, recognizing more than 15 years of volunteer work improving the quality of life of seniors living at Clementine Towers, advocating for seniors residing in Ottawa Community Housing (OCH), and helping to raise funds for disaster relief around the world.

    Marie, who is 88 years young, moved to the 258-unit Clementine Towers seniors apartment building in Alta Vista, operated by OCH, in 1999. The next year she became the president of the building’s social club and tenant association, a volunteer position she’s held ever since.

    With her enthusiastic and energetic leadership, the tenant association has organized hundreds of social events over the past 15 years including card playing, bingo, exercise classes, knitting groups, teas, dinner-dances, and fundraisers to help victims of natural disasters in various countries. The social and fundraising events are important to keeping seniors in the independent-living apartments physically active and engaged, warding off loneliness and isolation.

    In 2010, the Clementine Towers tenant association won an Ontario Non-Profit Housing Association Tenant Achievement Recognition Award for raising $1,500 for Doctors Without Borders to help earthquake victims in Haiti.

    The Mayor’s City Builder Award is a civic honour created to recognize an individual, group or organization that has, through outstanding volunteerism or exemplary action, demonstrated an extraordinary commitment to making our city a better place today and for the future. This may include lifelong service, outstanding acts of kindness, inspiring charitable work, community building or other exemplary achievements. Individuals, groups or organizations may be nominated by members of City Council or the public. The award is presented at the beginning of each City Council meeting.

     

  • Mayor’s City Builder Award – Marie McIntosh

    Mayor Jim Watson and Capital Ward Councillor David Chernushenko presented the Mayor’s City Builder Award today to Marie McIntosh, recognizing more than 15 years of volunteer work improving the quality of life of seniors living at Clementine Towers, advocating for seniors residing in Ottawa Community Housing (OCH), and helping to raise funds for disaster relief around the world.

    Marie, who is 88 years young, moved to the 258-unit Clementine Towers seniors apartment building in Alta Vista, operated by OCH, in 1999. The next year she became the president of the building’s social club and tenant association, a volunteer position she’s held ever since.

    With her enthusiastic and energetic leadership, the tenant association has organized hundreds of social events over the past 15 years including card playing, bingo, exercise classes, knitting groups, teas, dinner-dances, and fundraisers to help victims of natural disasters in various countries. The social and fundraising events are important to keeping seniors in the independent-living apartments physically active and engaged, warding off loneliness and isolation.

    In 2010, the Clementine Towers tenant association won an Ontario Non-Profit Housing Association Tenant Achievement Recognition Award for raising $1,500 for Doctors Without Borders to help earthquake victims in Haiti.

    mariemcintosh

  • Ottawa and Gatineau mayors to ensure federal parties address local issues

    OTTAWA – At a joint press conference today, Ottawa Mayor Jim Watson and Gatineau Mayor Maxime Pedneaud-Jobin outlined a three-point strategy to ensure local issues receive federal attention in the upcoming election.

    “You cannot have a strong Canada without a strong capital,” said Mayor Watson. “The future prosperity of Ottawa and Gatineau depends on a federal government that is an active, constructive partner on the issues that matter most to local residents.”

    “In the years ahead, we have big challenges and opportunities on issues such as affordable housing, infrastructure and transportation,” said Mayor Pedneaud-Jobin. “We will be encouraging any local candidate who wishes to be a Member of Parliament to engage in a constructive discussion about these issues.”

    The strategy includes:

    1.    Informing candidates about local priorities: All nominated candidates from each of the main political parties will be provided information on local priorities. Mayor Pedneaud-Jobin has already sent this information to Gatineau candidates. Mayor Watson will be holding in-person briefings at City Hall. Briefings will be held for each party separately, and will include transit, infrastructure and affordable housing, among other issues.

    2.    Questionnaires: The mayors of Ottawa and Gatineau will send short questionnaires on local priorities to federal party leaders and local candidates. Questionnaires will be sent out before the end of August and responses will be published simultaneously online before the end of September.

    3.    Debates: Parties will be invited to send one candidate each to a local issues debate organized at their respective City Hall. The Ottawa debate will be held at Ottawa City Hall on Monday, October 5. The debate will be moderated by Mark Sutcliffe and Véronique Soucy.

  • Can you dig it? City to consider growing more community gardens

    OTTAWA – Mayor Jim Watson today announced a proposal to allow for the creation of up to 20 new community gardens over the next four years.

    “Community gardens better utilize our public spaces and provide greater food security for residents,” said Mayor Watson. “Volunteer-managed gardens are playing an important community-building role across the city.”

    “This proposal is great news and builds upon the hundreds of volunteers who manage community gardens across the city, and the thousands who are able to participate in community gardening,” Moe Garahan, Executive Director of Just Food. “We’re seeing increased interest for community gardening and we would welcome more support to keep up with the demand.”

    Ottawa’s Community Gardening Network is managed by Just Food Ottawa, a community-based, non-profit organization. If the proposal is approved, the City would increase the value of its funding contract to this project by $15,000 annually (from $161,337 to $176,337), increasing the number of grants available for community garden groups. The total number of gardens created through these funds will depend upon the proposed size and cost of each new garden.

    There are currently 59 community gardens in the City of Ottawa. Several additional gardens are slated to open this fall, including the South Nepean Muslim Centre Community Garden, Kanata South Community Garden, the LindenLea Food and Wildlife Community Garden, and the Queensway Terrace North Community Garden.

    The proposal is related to a campaign commitment made by Mayor Watson during the last municipal election. To date, City Council has supported almost all of these commitments, including those related to affordable housing, economic development, and transportation.

    A staff report with full details will be available on ottawa.ca before the end of the day. The Community and Protective Services Committee will consider the proposal on August 20.